Archive | October, 2013

Breakthrough research produces brighter, more efficiently produced lighting

31 Oct

Breakthrough research produces brighter, more efficiently produced lighting

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30-Oct-2013

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Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California – Santa Barbara


(Santa Barbara, Calif.) By determining simple guidelines, researchers at UC Santa Barbara’s Solid State Lighting & Energy Center (SSLEC) have made it possible to optimize phosphors a key component in white LED lighting allowing for brighter, more efficient lights.

“These guidelines should permit the discovery of new and improved phosphors in a rational rather than trial-and-error manner,” said Ram Seshadri, a professor in the university’s Department of Materials as well as in its Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, of the breakthrough contribution to solid-state lighting research. The results of this research, performed jointly with materials professor Steven DenBaars and postdoctoral associate researcher Jakoah Brgoch, appear in The Journal of Physical Chemistry.

LED (light-emitting diode) lighting has been a major topic of research due to the many benefits it offers over traditional incandescent or fluorescent lighting. LEDs use less energy, emit less heat, last longer and are less hazardous to the environment than traditional lighting. Already utilized in devices such as street lighting and televisions, LED technology is becoming more popular as it becomes more versatile and brighter.

According to Seshadri, all of the recent advances in solid-state lighting have come from devices based on gallium nitride LEDs, a technology that is largely credited to UCSB materials professor Shuji Nakamura, who invented the first high-brightness blue LED. In solid-state white lighting technology, phosphors are applied to the LED chip in such a way that the photons from the blue gallium nitride LED pass through the phosphor, which converts and mixes the blue light into the green-yellow-orange range of light. When combined evenly with the blue, the green-yellow-orange light yields white light.

The notion of multiple colors creating white may seem counterintuitive. With reflective pigments, mixing blue and yellow yields green; however, with emissive light, mixing such complementary colors yields white.



Art to science

Until recently, the preparation of phosphor materials was more an art than a science, based on finding crystal structures that act as hosts to activator ions, which convert the higher-energy blue light to lower-energy yellow/orange light.

“So far, there has been no complete understanding of what make some phosphors efficient and others not,” Seshadri said. “In the wrong hosts, some of the photons are wasted as heat, and an important question is: How do we select the right hosts?”

As LEDs become brighter, for example a they are used in vehicle front lights, they also tend to get warmer, and, inevitably, this impacts phosphor properties adversely.

“Very few phosphor materials retain their efficiency at elevated temperatures,” Brgoch said. “There is little understanding of how to choose the host structure for a given activator ion such that the phosphor is efficient, and such that the phosphor efficiency is retained at elevated temperatures.”

However, using calculations based on density functional theory, which was developed by UCSB professor and 1998 Nobel Laureate Walter Kohn, the researchers have determined that the rigidity of the crystalline host structure is a key factor in the efficiency of phosphors: The better phosphors possess a highly rigid structure. Furthermore, indicators of structural rigidity can be computed using density functional theory, allowing materials to be screened before they are prepared and tested.

This breakthrough puts efforts for high-efficiency, high-brightness, solid-state lighting on a fast track. Lower-efficiency incandescent and fluorescent bulbs which use relatively more energy to produce light could become antiquated fixtures of the past.

“Our target is to get to 90 percent efficiency, or 300 lumens per watt,” said DenBaars, who also is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and co-director of the SSLEC. Current incandescent light bulbs, by comparison, are at roughly 5 percent efficiency, and fluorescent lamps are a little more efficient at about 20 percent.

“We have already demonstrated up to 60 percent efficiency in lab demos,” DenBaars said.

###


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Breakthrough research produces brighter, more efficiently produced lighting

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

30-Oct-2013

[

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]


Share Share

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ia.ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California – Santa Barbara


(Santa Barbara, Calif.) By determining simple guidelines, researchers at UC Santa Barbara’s Solid State Lighting & Energy Center (SSLEC) have made it possible to optimize phosphors a key component in white LED lighting allowing for brighter, more efficient lights.

“These guidelines should permit the discovery of new and improved phosphors in a rational rather than trial-and-error manner,” said Ram Seshadri, a professor in the university’s Department of Materials as well as in its Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, of the breakthrough contribution to solid-state lighting research. The results of this research, performed jointly with materials professor Steven DenBaars and postdoctoral associate researcher Jakoah Brgoch, appear in The Journal of Physical Chemistry.

LED (light-emitting diode) lighting has been a major topic of research due to the many benefits it offers over traditional incandescent or fluorescent lighting. LEDs use less energy, emit less heat, last longer and are less hazardous to the environment than traditional lighting. Already utilized in devices such as street lighting and televisions, LED technology is becoming more popular as it becomes more versatile and brighter.

According to Seshadri, all of the recent advances in solid-state lighting have come from devices based on gallium nitride LEDs, a technology that is largely credited to UCSB materials professor Shuji Nakamura, who invented the first high-brightness blue LED. In solid-state white lighting technology, phosphors are applied to the LED chip in such a way that the photons from the blue gallium nitride LED pass through the phosphor, which converts and mixes the blue light into the green-yellow-orange range of light. When combined evenly with the blue, the green-yellow-orange light yields white light.

The notion of multiple colors creating white may seem counterintuitive. With reflective pigments, mixing blue and yellow yields green; however, with emissive light, mixing such complementary colors yields white.



Art to science

Until recently, the preparation of phosphor materials was more an art than a science, based on finding crystal structures that act as hosts to activator ions, which convert the higher-energy blue light to lower-energy yellow/orange light.

“So far, there has been no complete understanding of what make some phosphors efficient and others not,” Seshadri said. “In the wrong hosts, some of the photons are wasted as heat, and an important question is: How do we select the right hosts?”

As LEDs become brighter, for example a they are used in vehicle front lights, they also tend to get warmer, and, inevitably, this impacts phosphor properties adversely.

“Very few phosphor materials retain their efficiency at elevated temperatures,” Brgoch said. “There is little understanding of how to choose the host structure for a given activator ion such that the phosphor is efficient, and such that the phosphor efficiency is retained at elevated temperatures.”

However, using calculations based on density functional theory, which was developed by UCSB professor and 1998 Nobel Laureate Walter Kohn, the researchers have determined that the rigidity of the crystalline host structure is a key factor in the efficiency of phosphors: The better phosphors possess a highly rigid structure. Furthermore, indicators of structural rigidity can be computed using density functional theory, allowing materials to be screened before they are prepared and tested.

This breakthrough puts efforts for high-efficiency, high-brightness, solid-state lighting on a fast track. Lower-efficiency incandescent and fluorescent bulbs which use relatively more energy to produce light could become antiquated fixtures of the past.

“Our target is to get to 90 percent efficiency, or 300 lumens per watt,” said DenBaars, who also is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and co-director of the SSLEC. Current incandescent light bulbs, by comparison, are at roughly 5 percent efficiency, and fluorescent lamps are a little more efficient at about 20 percent.

“We have already demonstrated up to 60 percent efficiency in lab demos,” DenBaars said.

###


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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/uoc–brp103013.php
Category: carrie   Geno Smith   Government Shutdown 2013   veep   Kendrick Lamar diss  

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Farrell’s steady hand leads Sox to World Series

31 Oct

Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell speaks during a news conference before a workout at Fenway Park in Boston, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. The Red Sox are scheduled to host the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 6 of baseball’s World Series on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell speaks during a news conference before a workout at Fenway Park in Boston, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. The Red Sox are scheduled to host the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 6 of baseball’s World Series on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell watches during practice before Game 3 of baseball’s World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell laughs as he watches his team during baseball practice on Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, in St. Louis. The Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals are set to play Game 3 of the World Series, Saturday in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Boston Red Sox starting pitcher Jon Lester (31) is taken out of the game by manager John Farrell during the eighth inning of Game 5 of baseball’s World Series Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell talks to Shane Victorino after Victorino was hit by a pitch during the eighth inning of Game 3 of baseball’s World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

(AP) — John Farrell failed in his last managerial job. The Boston Red Sox had their worst record in nearly a half century.

After a dismal 2012 season for both, they’re together now and that past seems so far away.

It’s a match made for the World Series.

“I try to live out what our team has lived out this year and, that is, not to look back,” Farrell said.

Why would he want to?

The Toronto Blue Jays were 73-89 last season, their second under Farrell, and actually trailed Boston in the standings with 10 games left. Then the Red Sox finally won something — the race to the bottom of the AL East. They lost nine of their last 10 games, dropping to 69-93 and insuring that Bobby Valentine’s tumultuous term as manager would end after one season.

Enter Farrell.

He had one year left on his contract with the Blue Jays so the Red Sox had to trade to get their old pitching coach back to run the show as manager.

His impact was immediate in spring training, the transition smoothed by his familiarity with many of his players.

“He came in there with a presence,” pitching ace Jon Lester said, “Came in there with his idea of how he wanted to run this team and stood up there in front of us and told us how he wanted it done.

“And I think the 40 guys or whatever that was in that room kind of looked around and it was like, ‘OK, let’s go do it.’ “

So they did, with a consistency and clubhouse cohesion missing from Valentine’s Way.

The Red Sox spent an AL-best 158 days in first place, were one of two major-league teams above .500 all year and had no losing streak longer than three games for just the second time in their 113 seasons.

And the players bonded long before their beards blossomed.

Gone were highly paid disgruntled players like Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford and Josh Beckett. In their place were team-oriented hustlers like Jonny Gomes, Mike Napoli, Shane Victorino, Stephen Drew and David Ross.

But it took the even-keeled Farrell and his communication skills to bring them all together after Valentine’s shoot-from-the-lip style failed.

“The thing with John is he’s so smart. I think it seems like he learns from every single person he’s around in baseball,” second baseman Dustin Pedroia said. “John this year has been unbelievable with all of us, just the communication.”

At 6-foot-4, the broad-shouldered Farrell has a military bearing. He leads his players and listens to them. He lets them know their roles, explains why they’re not in the lineup and sees them produce off the bench.

Before World Series games, he sits at an interview table, rarely blinking as he listens closely to questions. Then he answers thoughtfully, occasionally breaking into a smile.

And he’s not afraid to admit that he’s wrong.

With Game 3 tied 4-4 with one out in the top of the ninth, Farrell let Brandon Workman bat with one out rather than have Napoli pinch hit and make a double-switch at first base and pitcher.

Workman struck out. Then he left the game with one out and a runner at first in the bottom of the ninth when the Cardinals won 5-4 on an obstruction play.

“In retrospect, sure, I would have liked to (use a pinch hitter),” Farrell said. “Still, I wasn’t going to pinch-hit for Workman with no guarantee that Napoli drives one out of the ballpark.”

He also handles critics — there haven’t been many in Boston — with respect.

When he was booed by fans on his return to Toronto with Boston on April 4, Farrell said, “That goes back to how much people care, and that’s a good thing.

“Unfortunately, over the past couple of years, some things didn’t play out on the field as we had hoped.”

But now he’s in Boston where his philosophy is working out just fine.

“There’s a relentless approach to play a complete game every night,” Farrell said. “That attitude is what has allowed us to come back from so many deficits this year and never give an at-bat away, and certainly play to the 27th out every night.”

Unlike his predecessor, in Boston he has a strong relationship with his coaches and doesn’t call attention to himself by criticizing players.

Farrell hired Juan Nieves as his pitching coach then stayed out of his way despite having served in that role with the Red Sox from 2007-2010. The staff ERA of 3.79 was nearly a run less than last season’s and Boston’s best in 11 years.

“His genuineness as a person to me was the one thing that would allow him to connect with players,” Farrell said of Nieves.

Just like Farrell.

From that first meeting in spring training.

“Nobody had any questions,” Lester said. “It was our job to go out there and do what he told us to do. And I think we’ve done a good job of that.”

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/347875155d53465d95cec892aeb06419/Article_2013-10-30-BBO-World-Series-Red-Sox-Farrell/id-a9d01ee86cd846c0822d21c50b776897
Tags: emmys   marshawn lynch   iPhone 5S   9/11 Memorial   Whodunnit  

Resilience, recovery, grief on Sandy anniversary

30 Oct

Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy’s devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood. “Restricted Use” signs are plastered on many front doors. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Before signing herself, a woman looks at a large board with supportive messages for victims of Superstorm Sandy in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Candles and flashlights will light up the shore along the East Coast as survivors of Superstorm Sandy’s devastation pay their respects to what was lost when the storm roared ashore one year ago. In Staten Island, where Sandy roared ashore and killed 23 people, there are still plenty of reminders of the storm. Wallboard and debris are piled on front lawns. Bungalows are covered in plywood. “Restricted Use” signs are plastered on many front doors. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the new dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Volunteers plant beach grass on a newly constructed sand dune along the beach in the Breezy Point neighborhood in the Queens borough of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. A year ago, Superstorm Sandy ravaged the region. The beach grass will protect the dune, 1200 feet in length, from erosion. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

In early morning darkness, a worker prepares heavy machinery for the day as rebuilding work continues on the beach area of Seaside Heights and Seaside Park, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013. Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. A large Sandy-related fire on the boardwalk in September has slowed progress in the area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Residents attend a candlelight vigil at the West Hamilton Beach Volunteer Fire Department to commemorate the one-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, in the Queens borough of New York. U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced a second round of federal Sandy recovery aid of nearly $2.1 billion for New York state and over $1.3 billion in Community Development Block Grants for New York City. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

(AP) — For some, it’s something to mark — a year of recovery and rebuilding since Superstorm Sandy walloped the region — homes that have been restored, pride in the resiliency of people and neighborhoods.

But for others, there’s still a long road ahead and much work to be done. And for those who lost loved ones, the grief remains.

Sandy came ashore on Oct. 29, 2012, sending floodwaters pouring across the densely populated barrier islands of Long Island and the Jersey shore. In New York City, the storm surge hit nearly 14 feet, swamping the city’s subway and commuter rail tunnels and knocking out power to the southern third of Manhattan.

The storm was blamed for at least 182 deaths in the U.S. — including 68 in New York and 71 in New Jersey — and property damage estimated at $65 billion.

Here is a look at anniversary observances through a series of vignettes detailing how people are commemorating the unprecedented storm:

___

At Meade’s bar in the South Street Seaport, a “lights out” Sandy party was planned for Tuesday night to observe the historic neighborhood’s recovery.

“The neighbohood’s been here hundreds of years,” said owner Lee Holin. “It’s not going anywhere.”

Still, Holin’s mood wasn’t festive.

“I don’t just want to be the bar that survived Sandy,” he said as street artist friend who goes by the nickname “NDA” painted a mural in a stairwell above an eye-level water mark on the wall left by flooding.

Meade’s bar gained a loyal following by being one of the first businesses to open after the storm. But storefronts that went dark for months are starting to get new retail tenants willing to pay higher rents and charging customers more — in his eyes, bad news for the diehard locals.

“They’re trying to turn this into the Meatpacking District,” he complained, referring to the expensive, uber trendy neighborhood on Manhattan’s west side.

___

Ken Mandelbaum remembered looking out of his Brooklyn apartment window at the lower part of Manhattan and not being able to see a single thing, Sandy’s surging waters causing massive power outages.

“It was completely dark, it was unreal,” he said Tuesday, joining a couple of dozen others at Brooklyn Bridge Park, where they held electric candles to mark the anniversary of Sandy’s landfall, a commemoration that was also being done in other parts of coastal New York City and along the New Jersey shore.

Mandelbaum and his wife, who live on the 12th floor off a building at the water’s edge, didn’t evacuate during Sandy and spent days without power, using the stairs to get up and down from their home to the street.

“There were 240 steps,” Susie Mandelbaum said. “I counted them.”

___

An accident of geography left Giuseppe and Innocenza Picheo of New Jersey with two properties to rebuild after Sandy: a primary home in Moonachie and a second home in Manahawkin on Long Beach Island. The Moonachie house had “never had a drop of water” in 43 years before Sandy, Giuseppe Picheo said Tuesday.

“Even now, I still think about it at night, before I go to sleep,” Innocenza Picheo said. “When I go downstairs to wash clothes, I still look around and think about the water rushing in.”

Giuseppe Picheo said he has been able to rebuild both properties and that volunteers from a local church group helped him clear debris and start to rebuild his Manahawkin home. But he knows others haven’t been as fortunate.

“I’m back to normal, but I feel very sorry for those who aren’t, especially now when you see all the images again,” he said.

___

A group of volunteers in neon orange T-shirts was busy at work outside a Freeport, Long Island, home on Tuesday afternoon, cutting pieces of tile and molding on power saws in the driveway and garage of the split-level ranch they were helping repair.

The volunteers are part of the Samaritan’s Purse organization, a charitable group founded by the Rev. Franklin Graham that helps with disaster relief throughout the country.

Samaritan’s Purse supervisor Kevin Vallas said volunteers have been on Long Island since the days immediately following Sandy. He said the group has rebuilt four homes and assisted with cleaning out and repairs on dozens of others, both in New York and New Jersey.

“I get my rewards in heaven. I’m a Christian,” explained David Ray, a married father of two from Chillicothe, Ohio. “We’re commanded to be the hands and feet of Jesus. What we’re showing people here is love.”

___

Beatrice Spagnuolo was one of 23 people on Staten Island who died when Superstorm Sandy struck a year ago.

The 79-year-old woman was killed when her Midland Beach home flooded.

On Tuesday, her son Vincent Spagnuolo joined about 200 others who marched on a Midland Beach boardwalk to honor the memory of those who died on Staten Island.

As bagpipers played “Amazing Grace,” Vincent Spagnuolo said he still hadn’t gotten over his mother’s death. Spagnuolo’s own Staten Island home was also destroyed when Sandy struck.

___

Myra Camacho’s home in the Rockaways still has no electricity.

She spent nearly two months after Sandy trying to survive in her frigid, powerless home with her boyfriend, Walter Negron.

“We wrapped ourselves in blankets. We ate out of the churches,” Negron said.

They moved out after Camacho had a heart attack. She moved in with relatives. He’s been staying elsewhere.

Their luck might be about to change. The couple spent Tuesday morning with an inspector from a nonprofit housing group, who told them he could help with the restoration. He estimated it would cost $15,000.

“He said, ‘Don’t worry about it. We’re going to take care of it,'” Camacho said. “I don’t know. We’ve heard things like this before. I’m hopeful.”

___

When Sandy darkened much of the city, some New Yorkers were only hours old. Others weren’t even born.

On Tuesday, babies filled a Manhattan hospital room to celebrate their first birthdays — and their survival. Their parents and hospital staff lighted candles atop cupcakes and sang, “Happy birthday, dear babies.”

Kenneth Hulett III weighed only 2 pounds when emergency medical workers rushed him out of the New York Hospital intensive care unit and down the stairs while hooked up to an oxygen tank. His mother, Emily Blatt, says her faith sustained her as she was evacuated on an orange sled.

That day, more than 40 babies were safety moved from the hospital to other facilities.

___

Visiting a flood-damaged firehouse in Seaside Park, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said Tuesday was a day to remember volunteers and first responders who risked their lives to save others.

“I want us to think of how much better things look today than they did a year ago and celebrate that,” Christie said. “We also have to acknowledge that there’s still thousands of people out of their homes.”

New York Gov. Cuomo visited the National Museum of the American Indian in lower Manhattan, which was temporarily shut down last year by flooding and power outages.

Cuomo recalled the “feeling of powerlessness” seeing the southern tip of Manhattan submerged in water. He also warned that extreme weather is “the new normal” but said the city and state is now better equipped to withstand it.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg stopped by Staten Island, Coney Island and the Rockaways, where he thanked and chatted with workers.

“Most New Yorkers are I suspect are struggling with somber memories today, which is only natural,” Bloomberg said. “A year ago we endured the worst natural disaster ever to strike our city.”

___

Aiman Youssef found out the other day that one of his neighbors has been living in his own Staten Island garage.

He says many people in his shorefront neighborhood are still displaced or living in partially restored homes, often without basic facilities.

“A lot of people have moved out of the area,” Youssef said. “A lot of houses went into foreclosure.”

Some homeowners are still reluctant to accept help, Youssef said, while others have been stymied by bureaucracy. He pointed to a bungalow across the street from his property on Midland Avenue.

A woman is living there without heat despite a city program that was supposed to restore heat, electric and water service, he said.

“We were lower middle class,” Youssef said. “Now we’re poor.”

___

Associated Press reporters Wayne Parry in Seaside Park, N.J., David Porter in Little Ferry, N.J., Angela Delli Santi in Sayreville, N.J., Frank Eltman in Babylon, N.Y., and Eileen AJ Connelly, Verena Dobnik, Jake Pearson, Jonathan Lemire, David Caruso and Tom Hays in New York contributed to this report.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-10-29-US-Superstorm-Anniversary/id-92c6b90836184a1096ac55f6bfcf7ca1
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This Supposed Shot From the Nexus 5 Camera Doesn’t Look Half Bad

29 Oct

This Supposed Shot From the Nexus 5 Camera Doesn't Look Half Bad

Hey, the Nexus 5 rumor mill doesn’t sleep. These are supposedly some of the first images taken with the smartphone’s camera, and from the looks of this shot, it might not be quite as horrible as its predecessor.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/9Mfo7mLqFBY/this-supposed-shot-from-the-nexus-5-camera-doesnt-look-1453619669
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Massachusetts teen pleads not guilty to murdering teacher

28 Oct

By Scott Malone

BOSTON (Reuters) – Massachusetts authorities on Wednesday charged a 14-year-old high school student in the murder of a math teacher after finding the teacher’s body in woods near the school.

The student, Philip Chism, pleaded not guilty to the murder charge and was ordered held without bail in a brief proceeding at Salem District Court, according to the clerk’s office.

Chism has been charged as an adult, which could subject him to a longer prison sentence in an adult facility if he is found guilty of killing Colleen Ritzer, 24.

Massachusetts law allows people as young as 14 to be charged as adults when the crime is murder.

Police in Danvers, Massachusetts, began an investigation late on Tuesday after receiving calls that a student at the school and a teacher had not gone home, Essex County District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett told reporters on Wednesday.

After discovering blood in a second-floor bathroom, police extended their search to the woods behind the school, where they found Ritzer’s body.

“It was apparent that she was a homicide victim,” Blodgett said. “This is a terrible tragedy.”

Prosecutors said in court papers that an interview of Chism and surveillance video from the school showed that Chism murdered Ritzer and dumped her body behind the school.

Chism stood quietly, stooping slightly and dressed in a white shirt as he was charged on Wednesday.

Ritzer is the second U.S. educator this week to die in an incident involving a student after a Nevada middle school teacher was shot dead by a 12-year-old student on Monday.

Investigators from the local medical examiner’s office on Wednesday carried a stretcher out of the woods where Ritzer’s body was found.

Police on Tuesday had issued a missing-child report for Chism, who had recently moved to the area from Tennessee. A photo posted on the Danvers Police Department’s Facebook page at the time of the search showed a tall, lanky, short-haired Chism wearing a red and black soccer uniform.

He was found walking along a highway about 12:30 a.m. EDT on Wednesday (0430 GMT).

Students from the school left bouquets of flowers, a teddy bear and a note reading “Rest in peace, Ms. Ritzer, you will be missed” in front of the school.

SCHOOLS CLOSED

All public schools in Danvers, which is about 20 miles north of Boston, were closed on Wednesday, although police believed there was no continuing threat to public safety.

“We have no reason to believe there were any other suspects involved,” Blodgett said. He declined to comment on how Ritzer was killed or if she might have had any type of relationship with the student.

Ritzer’s family issued a brief statement to The Salem News asking for privacy.

“At this time we are mourning the tragic death of our amazing daughter and sister,” the family said. “Everyone that knew and loved Colleen knew of her passion, her teaching and how she mentored each and every one of her students.”

Ritzer described herself as a “Math teacher often too excited about the topics I’m teaching” on her Twitter account, @msritzermath, where she also posted homework assignments and links to math problems.

In the shooting incident in Nevada on Monday, teacher Michael Landsberry, 45, was shot and killed when he tried to stop the 12-year-old student armed with a handgun after he wounded two fellow students, then later turned the gun on himself.

“We will probably never know all the factors that accumulate to unleash this kind of violence, but we must commit to doing all we can to make sure students and educators are safe in our schools,” Dennis Van Roekel, president of the National Education Association, a labor union for school teachers, said in reaction to this week’s incidents.

(Additional reporting by Daniel Trotta and Brendan O’Brien; Editing by Paul Thomasch, Gunna Dickson and Cynthia Osterman)

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/massachusetts-teen-pleads-not-guilty-murdering-teacher-061454309.html
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There Are Actually Lots of Ways to Time Travel

27 Oct

Okay so yeah, we can’t actually do all of this time traveling in practice, but there’s a lot of jumping around that physicist know would work in theory. And if they could just figure out how to create negative energy, also known as exotic matter for some reason, we could build spinning cylinders and wormholes to our collective heart’s content. And as Minute Physics points out, don’t forget the type of time travel we all do constantly. It’s quotidian enough to be kind of annoying, but it’s actually kind of great to remember that we’re all moving through space-time all the . . . time.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/Av3dPSh48Ts/there-are-actually-lots-of-ways-to-time-travel-1452913552
Tags: charlie hunnam   lesean mccoy   seattle seahawks   aaron hernandez   Kelly LeBrock  

Beyond smartphones: 12 crazy places you’d never expect to find Android

26 Oct

What a long, strange trip it’s been.

Actually, scratch that: While it feels like Android has been around forever, the open-source operating system that could has been gracing hardware for five scant years, celebrating its fifth birthday on Tuesday. And ever since HTC’s G1 first hit T-Mobile in 2008, Android has managed to spread its wings far beyond mere phones and tablets.

From coffee makers to freakin’ ninja robots just itching to sock you in the mouth, here are the most intriguing, eccentric, and downright weird places you’ll find Android. Phones? Pfah. Phones are boring.

Android fridge

#TweetingFromTheFridgeYo

Fetching the milk: Also boring. Fetching the milk while pounding out Twitter blasts and futzing around with your Evernote to-do lists: Not so boring. Samsung certainly thinks Wi-Fi-enabled appliances are the way of the future, and it’s hoping to speed up the revolution with Smart Fridges that include custom, Android-powered LCD touchscreens.

Don’t start drooling just yet. The cheapest of Samsung’s Android fridges starts at a not-so-mouthwatering $2,700.

Android washing machine

Everybody does laundry, but nobody enjoys doing laundry. Enter Samsung once again.

The company’s $1,600 WF457ARGSGR/AA front-loading washing machine may rock king-size capacity and fancy-schmancy modes, but it’s the washer’s surprising Android inclusion that’s the true star of the show. The appliance’s controls come courtesy of an 8-inch, Android-powered touchscreen. You can use Samsung’s SMART Washer/Dryer app to manage your dirty laundry from afar. It’ll even notify you when the load’s done.

Android camera

The Galaxy brand—and Android—will one day be found in everything if Samsung has its way.

An Android camera? Who ever thought of such a wack… Wait a minute. Maybe an Android camera isn’t so crazy—smartphone pics do kind of suck, and an Android camera would make it easier to slap high-resolution food images on Instagram. It’s like two gadgets in one!

Does reality match the multi-device hybrid theory? Check out TechHive’s review of the Samsung Galaxy GC110 to find out if Android cameras are more “all-in-none” or “all-in-one.”

Android coffee maker

Android be jammin’, and brewing caffeinated beverages.

At least Android cameras are actual things

A few years ago, an intriguing design for an Android coffee brewer made the rounds. More than a mere French Press, the so-called “Appresso” would theoretically dock your smartphone to charge it, play tunes through integrated speakers, and make recommendations based on your tastes and moods. Designers In-oh Yoo & Bong-yup Song even envisioned QR code-clad K-cups that you could scan for details about your coffee, or music suggestions that matched the blend. Seriously.

The Appresso never made it past the design stages. Caffeine addiction remains analog to this day.

Sentinels from The Matrix

Man the guns, Neo!

Oh wait, that’s just the Nexus Q, Google’s, um, forward-looking collaborative music player. Whew! People aren’t fleshy batteries just yet.

Killer ninja master

YET. Witness the smiling, Android-powered face of future Skynets: RT Corporation’s V-sido x RIC Ninja Master. Focus on the downward-pointing eyebrows rather than the grin, because this robot—which gets marching orders from its Android tablet brains—was designed to punch you in the face. And if you try to flee, the Ninja Master’s bipedal legs will help it chase you down and beat you to a pulp.

Fortunately, this amusing monstrosity has yet to become self-aware. Meatbags like you and me have to control the robot manually, with one person punching in front of a motion sensor to guide the Ninja Master’s arms, and another controlling the legs via an app.

Ninja Master’s a game, not a futuristic battle bot. Think of it more as Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots meets Real Steel rather than the beginning stages of a killer robot army—at least for now. Here’s a video of the Android-powered Muhammed Ali in action.

Smart TV

Not all squawk boxes are controlled by proprietary, streamlined software like Roku or Apple TV’s respective solutions. The K91 Smart TV that Lenovo showed at CES 2012 runs Android 4.0, opening up your big screen to the gajillions of Android apps.

Alas, the allure of running QuickOffice on your TV turned out to be not so alluring, and the K91 was never released outside of China. But you can convert any HDTV into a member of the Android army with a ‘smart stick’ like the $60 RikoMagic MK802 II. (Those aren’t so good for actual TV watching, though.)

Your local convenience store

Bow before your scrumptious Android god.

7-11 is a weird place to find Android, but thanks to Google’s partnership with KitKat for Android 4.4, a chocolatey version of the cute little Android guy can be found next to Crunch bars and Butterfingers—at least on the candy’s wrapper.

3D digital picture frame

Nikon’s NF-300i isn’t your average digital picture frame. This Wi-Fi-enabled bad boy leans on Android to bring 3D stereoscopic pictures to Japanese peepers, and it’s free. Well, technically. Nikon will send you one if you sign up for a My Picturetown 3D membership, which stores your pictures in the cloud and converts them to 3D. Here’s the catch: A My Picturetown 3D subscription will set you back the equivalent of $200 per year.

Maybe this is one technology that should have stayed stupid.

The future of printing?

It prints, it copies, it plays Angry Birds.

In 2010, HP took a walk on the wild side with the HP PhotoSmart eStation, a pretty decent printer that stood out because its touchscreen controls were plopped on a 7-inch Android 2.1 tablet—a tablet that could be detached and used as a separate slate or e-reader. Android printers have yet to take off, though. (Maybe the sluggish TouchSmart UI HP tossed on the device had something to do with it.)

Universal remote, and I mean universal

Conspin’s $350 Andi-One was pitched as a universal TV remote, but Android 2.1 helped this hardware do much more. Beyond controlling up to 50 devices via RF, infra-red, and Wi-Fi, the Andi-One ran more than 100,00 Android apps, controlled your HTPC’s keyboard and mouse, browsed the Web, juggled email, and more. You could even use it as a basic VoIP handset.

The jack of all trades approach doesn’t appear to have worked, though. Andi-One’s webpage lies dead as a doorknob.

Retail point-of-sale units

Image: CasioCasio’s VX-100 point of sale system comes preloaded with Registroid Cloud software.

Android is expanding into the business sector, too. The small footprint and low power needs of Google’s operating system is perfect for simple digital signage boxes, and retailers can even buy Android-powered point-of-sale systems for handling transactions. Let’s hope they’re a bit more hardened than your average Android smartphone.

The Android of the future

Yes, Android is more than your average mobile OS. But Android is still a relative newcomer with a vast sea of possibilities lying ahead. Just imagine…

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Source: http://www.techhive.com/article/2056181/beyond-smartphones-12-crazy-places-youd-never-expect-to-find-android.html#tk.rss_all
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